Category Archives: Pediatric Dentistry

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Pediatric Dentist

A pediatric dentist has two or three years of supplementary training after completing the regular dental course. This additional education includes the detailed anatomical changes that occur in our mouths from birth to adolescence. This affords them the expertise to identify delicate changes occurring now that may lead to serious problems later on.

Prevention and Your Pediatric Dentist

Beginning with early checkups the dentist can identify small, subtle changes in such things as unexpected jaw growth or teeth emerging prematurely. A set of x-rays can provide a base to allow the dentist to identify unwanted patterns quickly as they occur.

When you make an annual appointment with your pediatrician, consider making one with your pediatric dentist too. They have the current information for oral health care in kids. Pediatric dentists prefer to teach parents and children how to care for their teeth. The best way to brush, and floss and what to be aware of is all part of our learning program. We want your child to have healthy teeth, and we can show you how to accomplish that. We also assist with thumb sucking and canker sores and teach you how diet is a major factor in good oral health.

Without strong teeth, your child’s ability to chew is diminished, and chewing is the first step in the digestion process. Decayed or misaligned teeth can also affect the clarity of their speech and lead to more complicated health problems.

Anxiety

Most parents don’t bring their children to a dentist until the harm is done, and their child is in pain. This may be due to financial restrictions or anxiety on the part of the parent. Be aware your child will pick up on your fears before you do. We assure you- our preferred status amongst our young patients is earned, we are gentle and friendly.

You can help make this easy by explaining what will be done. How pictures might be taken and instruments might be placed in their mouth, but they shouldn’t be afraid. You can stay with your child if that helps them. If extensive or complex treatments are needed, we do offer sedation therapy. Once the procedures are complete, you can remain with them while they recover.

After Care

We provide you with clear written instructions listing the dos and don’ts when you are ready to go home. Take a minute to read them and ask any questions. If you are concerned after you return home call us. We will be glad to help.

Special Care

Every employee in the office is specially trained to make children feel comfortable and safe in this environment. In the past, procedures were done without any explanation. They were just told to sit down, open your mouth and don’t move. Recent studies show children tolerate medical or dental processes as well as adults when each step is explained to them, and their parents are either calm or absent.

We not only provide the highest quality dental care we take into consideration the emotional well-being of our patient before during and after each visit.

We want all kids to have proper dental care, for this reason, we offer evening and weekend office visits. We also will assist you with insurance claims and we accept payment plans and Medicaid.

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Tooth extraction for kids

A tooth extraction is a procedure where the tooth is removed completely from the bone socket beneath. There are a number of different reasons why a tooth might need to be extracted, including as a result of tooth decay, in conjunction with another orthodontics treatment, or because of the growth of problematic wisdom teeth. For some children – and even parents of young children – a tooth extraction can seem like a scary procedure, particularly if you don’t know what to expect.

To ease your worry, it is important to educate both yourself and your child to relieve some anxiety around the entire tooth extraction experience.

What to expect

First appointment:

During your first appointment, an x-ray will be taken of the area to assess the severity of damage to the tooth to see if it is in need of a tooth extraction. If your dentist has determined that your child’s tooth is beyond repair and needs to be removed, another appointment for the tooth extraction will be scheduled.

Before the procedure:

On the day of your child’s tooth extraction, an antibiotic may be prescribed to get rid of any infection that might have caused damage to the tooth to begin with. Even though the tooth will be removed, it is important to treat this infection before the extraction to prevent the spread of the infection to surrounding teeth.

If needed, an anti-anxiety medication may be taken on the night before the tooth extraction, and an additional pill can be taken before the procedure for children who are extremely nervous about it.

The procedure:

Before the tooth is extracted, the site around the tooth will be numbed with a local anesthetic like Novocain. This numbing should help put your child at ease and make sure they feel no pain during the procedure. Once the area is completely numbed, your dentist will wiggle the tooth out of its socket using dental forceps.

If the tooth is located beneath the surface of the gum line, your dentist may need to also remove some gum tissue to get to the tooth. In this case, your child might receive a stronger sedative before the extraction, such as nitrous oxide, or “laughing gas”, to relax your them during the procedure.

Care after the procedure:

After the tooth extraction is complete, your child will need to bite on a gauze pad until a blood clot forms around the site to stem the bleeding. Once the clot has formed, it is important not to dislodge it, as it can expose the bone, causing dry socket.

If any pain or swelling is experienced after the Novocain wears off, an ice pack can be applied to the area, and an over-the-counter anti-inflammatory, such as Ibuprofen, may be used. Your child will only be able to eat soft foods for 24 hours after the extraction and is discouraged from drinking from straws or spitting forcefully. After each meal, your child should rinse his or her mouth with saltwater. If stiches were placed after the extraction, they will dissolve within a couple weeks.

 

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Tooth colored composite fillings

Tooth colored composite fillings can be an inexpensive and attractive way to restore a small amount of tooth decay on a child’s tooth. If your child is in need of a filling, the type of material used for the filling will depend on a number of factors, including:

The position and visibility of the affected tooth
The extent of damage to the tooth
Budgetary constraints
Allergies to certain materials, such as metals

When are tooth colored composite fillings used for children?

Dental fillings are used to treat cavities on a child’s tooth and protect the tooth from further damage, infection or decay. Even baby teeth should be salvaged whenever possible to avoid problems with permanent teeth filling in correctly. These cavities may be identified during your child’s next routine dental exam by sight or by a digital x-ray. Your dentist will let you know what options are available to fill a tooth that has been decayed. If the decay is extensive, a root canal may be needed before a filling is placed. Because of its natural, tooth colored appearance, composite fillings are typically used for visible or front-facing teeth; however, they may also be used on non-visible teeth and molars as well.

What are the benefits of tooth colored composite fillings?

There are a number of advantages of tooth colored fillings over alternatives such as gold or silver amalgam, including a more natural appearance and minimal tooth preparation in advance of the filling placement.

Natural looking:

Composite fillings are considered to be a more attractive filling alternative to gold or amalgam because the material hardens into the shade of one’s natural tooth. Therefore, tooth colored composite fillings are typically used for visible or front-facing teeth.

Minimal tooth preparation:

Composite fillings require less healthy tooth structure to be removed into order to restore the tooth compared to alternatives.

Non-metal material:

Composite fillings can be ideal for children who are allergic to metals like silver amalgam. Tooth colored composite fillings can be a great option for children. They offer an effective and natural-looking way to improve your child’s oral health and dental function by preventing the spread of infection or decay from a cavity. If your child has a cavity that needs to be filled, contact our office to see what filling options are available for your child.